NaGa DeMon: The League

Today I want to share my notes about the League with you.

The League

Gliese 581g (Image: Lynette Cook)The League of Free Worlds was formed shortly after discovery of the Slipstream drive and the first contact with an alien species. The first contact showed that it was necessary that mankind spoke with one voice at least in matters of interspecies relations and space exploration. In 2397 the League was formed by the major space-faring nations on Earth, the Mars colony, the Icarus space colony which is situated near the Jupiter trojans, and the newly-established colony on Gliese 581g. Each member elects a number of representative which form the League’s Council. The Council then elects the Speaker from among its ranks who acts as diplomatic representative of the League. The League gets funded by its member states and uses these funds to fund colony projects, the League Defense Force and the Institute of Space Sciences which is responsible for space exploration and developing new technologies. The League Defense Force defends the League against attacks from outside threats and also helps to maintain order in League space. The LDF has no jurisdiction on Earth or within the space claimed by one of the member states.

Any thoughts? As always any advice is highly appreciated!

9 thoughts on “NaGa DeMon: The League”

    1. Everyone and their sister comes up with settings that sound like this. To a free-market anarchist or a libertarian, this sounds obnoxious, authoritarian, and depressing. A people and the state are not one and the same creature. Within large swathes of RPG settings, everything is defined in terms of government and politics, as though there was nothing else! /rant

      1. Most settings are described top-down purely as a logical way of organising the information. The macro-to-micro approach does make the government of people seem more important (being first) but it doesn’t mean that the people who live in the league are the one and same creature.

        What’s more, a free market has nothing to do with the government organisation. Restrictions of free market are a bi-product of legal and economic protection, not how the governing body is organised.

        You’re also judging the setting based on a single organisation in it, not the whole. If you read Michael’s first post, you will notice that the core principle of the setting is revolution and the conflict between The League and the rebels (as yet defined). An anarchist or libertarian would be most impressed with that. To have a rebellion worthwhile, you need to have structure in place to rebel against. This is that structure.

        Your comment isn’t very useful, perhaps you might have something a little more constructive to give? Or are you just going to rant with cowardly anonymity? Perhaps do so elsewhere.

  1. I like the slightly different take, in that the Earth is not politically united, yet forms a single entity to present itself as such. Add to the fact that only space-faring nations are represented in the League, and there is plenty of potential for “internal” political strife. Also, the League itself is now a separate political entity, with its own agendas and potential for conflict with its member states.

    Question: Would the UN still be around at this time, or would it have been disbanded or replaced? Perhaps the League is its successor?

  2. I am very interested, and the initial description gives me hope for the game and setting. I have read a little more than the rest of you (hey being the roadie has its privileges!) and I believe it’s got a lot of potential. Of course in these games we use a lot of tropes and shorthand which facilitate a coming language when we game. I think it’s all about making it your own and putting your own twist. Looking forward to this Michael!!!

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