Category Archives: Savage Worlds

The End is Near – Adventure Background Part 1

As part of the upcoming CONcurrent I’m preparing to run a Savage Worlds sci-fi game. I wrote a little introduction for the game that I mean to share with players who have confirmed their participation in the activity. If you’ve read my posts I’ve been mulling a sci-fi game for a while, even went as far as posting a first draft of the introduction to that game (which, despite working on regularly in RL, I’m yet to update here in the blog). This fits with that introduction since in a way this is the end of that campaign. The final book end to the setting I introduced in that post. This in turn leads to a previous sci-fi campaign I played some years ago. Yes in a very meta way I’m connection my games, this has always been part of the conception of cohesive universe, and I hope my past players and future players are not too turned off by the revelation.

Be forewarned, this is NOT hard sci-fi and I realize I’m playing fast and loose with science with the hope of creating an interesting situation for the game. I don’t think it’s quiet space fantasy, more space pulp. I hope you like it. Without further ado, The End is Near…

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Humanity expanded from its cradle in the Sol System and into the galaxy for over four hundred years. Humans fought and bled, carved a Union from the ashes of war and tore it down to create something better. Saviors for some, hated enemies to others, the other species of the galaxy learned that humans went where they wanted and took what they needed. They became the pre-eminent power in the galaxy with their innumerable population stretching across most habitable systems. Known for their pioneering spirit it is said that humanity was looking at the vast gulf between galaxies, longing to discover what awaited there, when their doom finally arrived…

The Great Plague struck fast and with terrifying consequences. At first spreading through contact it was soon reported airborne and almost all the infected suffered a horrible, but thankfully quick, death. The origin and cause of the plague remained a mystery, constantly mutating, no cure discovered. The Great Plague behaved like no human illness before it, spreading at first in densely populated systems, but soon carried all across the galaxy, by traders at first and by refugees fleeing the purges later. Systems were quarantined, populations with high infection rates decimated to avoid contagion, a thousand magical cures promised, all failed.

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The man behind the Stargazer! An interview with Michael Wolf…

I’ve been fortunate enough to be contributing for this blog for two and a half years now… How time flies! Through this time I have made many new friends, had the opportunity to interact with other fans and authors, but most of all I have been really lucky to know this guy sometimes called Stargazer after discovering his blog while searching for material about Savage Worlds. I was fortunate enough to be here when Michael invited other writers to contribute to the blog. So as a contributor I became a roadie to this show he’s been running, a roadie to the rock star himself, the STARGAZER!

Stargazer’s Worlds had its anniversary a couple of days ago and I thought it would be fitting that for the 4year anniversary I’d turn the tables on the our fearless leader and interview the guy responsible for the blog and giving us contributors a forum to talk about our passion, role-playing games.

Sunglar: Hello Michael, why don’t you begin by telling us a little bit about you? Who are you? Who is the man doing the stargazing?

Michael:  Who am I? Good question. My usual response is that I’m a 37 year old German guy who loves roleplaying games, gaming in general, has an interest in astronomy, science in general and who enjoys writing about his hobby.

Sunglar: I think you have talked about this before on the blog, but just in case there are any new readers, how did you get into gaming?

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Short Cthulian Bit: The Spiraling Worm

If you follow me over social media (and you can find out how to at the little bio at the end of this post) you might have read my gushing praise for The Spiraling Worm a Cthulhu Mythos collection of short stories, interconnected by a common set of characters, some stories flowing from one to the next flawlessly. All the stories put together almost seem like a novel set in a Delta Green like universe.

I discovered the book while watching episode 193 of Game Geeks, the Agents of Oblivion review (A very good book BTW, Michael posted about it here and here) which referred me to their previous review of The Spiraling Worm book, episode 58 from way back in 2008. This book has been out for a while, how did I miss it?

I have read a lot of Cthulhu Mythos books, collections of HP Lovecraft’s works and those he inspired. The results can be hit or miss. I usually enjoy them but many collections are a mixed bag of gems and turds. So far my favorite Cthulhu Mythos anthology was Shadows over Baker Street, containing the wonderful (and available for free here) A Study in Emerald by Neil Gaiman. The Spiraling Worm just became my favorite anthology.

While reading it I had to go back and reread some of Lovecraft stories I had not read in a long time, The Shadow Out of Time and At the Mountains of Madness. Stories in the book weave the mythology of the Mythos in, what seems to me, fresh and modern ways. These days more and more I find myself passing along books I read so other might enjoy them, partly due to my desire of sharing a good book, and partly due to not having space to keep books I will probably never read again; this is not the case here! This book is going up on the shelf and I may need to get a new one to lend to friends. It is that good…

Kudos to David Conyers and John Sunseri for such wonderful stories and making me into a fan. If you’ve read it, you know how good it is, if you haven’t, read it, you won’t be sorry. Now to get The Eye of Infinity