M42 Orion Nebula, M43, and NGC 1977 complex

Freebie: Secrets of the Ancients for Traveller

While reading up on the Ancients on various Traveller forums and wikis I discovered that Mongoose Publishing is giving away the whole “Secrets of the Ancients” campaign for free.

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The 202-paged PDF contains an epic campaign that reveals one of the major secrets at the heart of the Third Imperium setting. If you are planning to run a game set into the OTU, you definitely should get a copy of this from the official Mongoose Publishing store. The download is free, you just need to be registered.

badguys

When You Realize that You’re the Baddy

I have always been interested in history and I always found it quite intriguing to play in historic roleplaying games. So it was of course no surprise that I backed Achtung! Cthulhu which combines Lovecraftian elements with the history of WW2. For most of my readers playing in such a game has no special significance. The vast of majority of my readers is from one of the countries who were known as the Allies in WW2. But for me – as a German – things are a bit different. My people were the bad guys back then.

I am usually a very mild-mannered and peaceful person, but there’s one thing I particularly hate: fascism. Fascists and Nazis make me terribly angry. For me (and probably you as well) the Hitler regime was definitely what we’d call the bad guys. So if I’d ever play in such a game I’d probably play an Allied soldier or something similar. It just wouldn’t feel right for me to play one of the supporters of said regime. I think I could portray Nazi NPCs as a GM, but never as a player. It just feels terribly wrong.

Because of our history I always hesitated to actually run a game set in WW2. I am sure there are many interesting stories to be told, but I fear it’s hard to do it in a proper way that also respects the victims of the war. I guess I might be overthinking things. Perhaps it’s because I always try to do the right thing. My question to you, my dear readers, is how do you see this? Would you play one of the bad guys? Do you think that topics like the Holocaust can be properly handled in a roleplaying game? How do you deal with your home country’s history in a roleplaying enviroment?

Since this is a very serious and complicated topic, please let me try to end the post on a lighter note:

corporia

First Look: Corporia

imageToday I was contacted by Mark Plemmons, designer of the urban fantasy RPG Corporia. He’s a fan of my blog and wanted me to have a complimentary copy of his game. As an avid collector of RPGs I was more than glad to accept his offer. So I downloaded my copy from DriveThruRPG and checked it out.

My first impression: wow, what a great-looking game! Corporia uses mostly photos for its artwork, which I usually don’t like, but in this case it’s done well – very well. But before I get into details, let me tell you what Corporia is about. It’s an urban fantasy roleplaying game set in “The City”, a metropolis rules by an alliance of mega-corps. One of the leaders of these corporations is CEO Lance Martin, who is actually an reincarnation of Sir Lancelot du Lac. The players are members of an elite supernaturally-powered special ops unit which is owned by the aforementioned Mr. Martin. The players got their powers through a phenomenon known as the Flux, which is also the cause for mutated humans, monsters and other things that go bump in the night.

imageI haven’t dug too deeply into rules or background yet, but what I glanced so far looks very promising. The rules system used doesn’t look to complicated – which is always a plus to me – and the premise of a near-future corporate setting combined with Arthurian legend is pretty brilliant. The game makes use of character archetypes which should make character creation a pretty quick process. The archetypes in the core rules are Badge (employees of private security companies), Hacker (exactly that), Headhunter (employment recruiters and assassins), Journo (reporters, journalists), Knight-Errant (reincarnated medieval knights), Lister (celebrities), Radical (everthing from punks to idealistic college professors), Runner (professional couriers, traceurs), Sorcerer (your regular 21st century spellcaster), Suit (corporate execs), Thinker (basically all kinds of researchers), Witcher (more traditional spellcasters), and Zero (blue-collar workers who are keeping The City running).

The 211-paged PDF contains everything you need to run a game of Corporia including all the rules, a detailed description of “The City”, a GM section containing Adventures, NPCs you can use as allies or enemies, and an extensive index. Overall Corporia looks pretty exciting. At the moment I am focused on other games, but I am tempted to give it a thorough read so that I can run it at one of our next RPG pub meetings. If you want to learn more about Corporia, you can check out the publisher’s website. The PDF version is available at DriveThruRPG and sets you back mere $9.99 which is a more than fair price.

A Roleplaying Games blog