The Lost Continent Illyria

Some time ago our fellow RPGBlogger Philippine Gamer has posted about a D&D 4th Edition campaign setting a member of his gaming group, R. Velasco, created: “The Lost Continent Illyria – A Renaissance Magiteck Setting”.
Although (or perhaps because) I am currently working on my own project “World of Asecia”, I had to check out his work.
And I was totally blown away. The setting is only 14 pages long but it’s very well written and uses some great artwork. The PDF document almost looks like a professional roleplaying sourcebook on par with WotC’s work.
Here’s an excerpt for your convenience:

Illyria is a setting where magic, fantasy and technology exist side by side.

Magitech, Portals and Magical skyships, espers and engineers, summoners, and gunknights. Illyria is an unforgiving monarchy where the blood of dragons promote a person’s identity and social status. But still heroes arise in the name of the Queen, or in the name of the Country. Never both.

If you are looking for some setting for your D&D game or some inspiration for your campaign check it out! You won’t regret it!

Roleplaying music: Elyrion Soundtrack

Elyrion is an upcoming german steampunk fantasy roleplaying game. It will be released in the coming days, probably on SPIEL ’08 in Essen. There will also be an official soundtrack composed by Erdenstern. Erdenstern is known for their five “Into the…” albums that contain hours of instrumental music perfectly suited for your roleplaying sessions (Check out my post about them). The music was in fact composed with fantasy roleplaying designed. I will review the soundtrack as soon as it’s out. Until then you can listen to a medley released at the official Erdenstern site.

Elyrion Soundtrack – Medley

Heroes’ Guild

The video game “Fable” featured a “Heroes’ Guild” that was a center of learning an training for Heroes for hire. In the game the player’s character entered the guild after his family was killed and is trained in swordmanship, archery and magic. During the game there were many quests and often the player was able to choose if he wanted to take the good or evil route. The guild’s members were not forced to be “good”.

Could such an institution work in a D&D setting for example? I say: “why not?”. In most campaigns the players’ characters are some kind of mercenaries, hired swords, treasure hunters or soldiers of fortune. But every party is usually on its own. So why not introduce some kind of “Heroes’ Guild” or “Adventurers’ Union” to the game that helps adventurers to organize, enforces some regulations and represents the adventuring part of the population at the royal court? 

I think the name “Adventurers’ Union” is much better than the slightly cheesy “Heroes’ Guild”. So, let’s go with that. Ok, we have settled on a name let’s make up some more details of our new faction. It makes sense that the union has offices in all the major towns, so that interested hero-wannabes may sign up and join the union. As a member of the union you are allowed to wear the official union badge and take on union-sponsored quests. You also have to pay some percentage of your income to the union. The union will make sure that you get paid when you’ve done your job and will provide places where you can rest, train and socialize with other adventurers.

A Roleplaying Games blog

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